Thanksgiving message from Jim Loewen


Jim Loewen is the author of, among other works, “Lies My Teacher Told Me”, “Lies Across America”, and “Sundown Towns.” He ended the most recent email to his list with the following:
“Best wishes for a happy Thanksgiving. Please don’t thank God for your blessings. S/he didn’t do it! S/he isn’t responsible for America being the biggest military, dominant culture, etc. Just enjoy friends, family, and food … OK?”
_______________________________________________ HCCN mailing list HCCN@mainetalk.org mainetalk.org/mailman/listinfo/hccn_mainetalk.org

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Fwd: TALK AT MORGAN BAY ZENDO OPEN TO PUBLIC: SUNDAY, NOV 24 @ 10 AM




“Sally Bowden-Schaible,  Founder of the Buddhist Alliance for Non-Violence and Human Rights in Israel-Palestine” will speak at 10 am Sunday, Nov 24, at the Morgan Bay Zendo (Rte 176, 2.4 miles from surry village). Sally will speak about her recent trip with a group of Maine residents to Palestine to help olive farmers harvest their crops and, in this way, helped protect olive farmers from being harassed.

Anyone interested is free to attend.
Thanks,
Hugh


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Fwd: Democracy Forum: Listen – Friday, November 15


Have a listen!

Is Government Doing Good? ….

Friday, November 15
Is Government Doing Good: Policy Feedback Effects and the Civic Divide

LWV-Downeast hosts a monthly radio program on democracy in cooperation with WERU FM. 

This month, we'll talk about new political science research into policy feedback effects and how public policy design affects people's sense of themselves as citizens and their propensity to participate. We'll take listener questions during the second half of the show.

Special Guests:

  • Amy Fried, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Maine

  • Don Moynihanthe McCourt Chair at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University

Learn more.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, streaming at weru.org

Listen live from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. WERU Community Radio:
89.9 FM Blue Hill
Streaming Online

Subscribe to the Podcast: iTunes | iOS | Android | RSS | Feed | Instructions

             
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Our mailing address is:

Democracy Maine

PO Box 18187

Portland, ME 04112-8187

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Protecting Maine’s fishing heritage




From: KarenTom Adamo <radiusmyfairpoint@outlook.com>


TO: ALL RECIEPIENTS,
From: Tom Adamo
Subject : Your Permission

Good Morning All,
As you may know the Maine Department of Marine Resources has just approved a 40 acre aquaculture lease  in Maquoit Bay, near Brunswick Maine.
As a result of the lease proposal and its approval the residents of that area, along with many lobsterman, have organized a statewide organization called Protecting Maine’s Fishing Heritage;  its goal is to influence DMR through legislative change.  The proposed legislation LR 2718 will give Maine residents more authority related to aquaculture.

I respectfully request that you email the lead person directly at Crystall@knightcanney.com or that you grant me permission to add your name to the list of supporters of  LR 2718. The statement below will be forwarded through the appropriate legislative channels.

“We the undersigned are demonstrating our support LR 2718. We are concerned that the issues around large aquaculture leases are detrimental to lobsterman, create a loss of public access to the ocean and are not sited properly so the ocean can be used by everyone. We also share concerns with Protecting Maine’s Fishing Heritage that leases can be transferred without a mandatory public hearing. Please consider moving LR 2718 forward.”

Please email me or Crystal with your permission or questions.

Thank you so much for reading and supporting.

Best,
Tom Adamo
207-326-8868
The Earth does not need us. We need the Earth


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Armistice Day Poem


From Doug Rawlings




               NOVEMBER COMES


November comes on to me like a C-130

slinking into Dover Air Force base

laden with tin caskets

draped in red, white, and blue


I know, I know

I should just

let it be


Okay.

I can still do this:

push my shopping cart down

the local IGA’s aisles

pick up cheese and wines and crackers

while avoiding aluminum cans

like the plague

pay the cashier

smile at the bagger

push the cart out into the parking lot

neatly place everything I just bought

into the dumpster out back


light up a smoke

relax


Sure, sure,

you want me to join in

on your celebrations

bless our bounty

accept your thanks

for my service

as if I were some Pilgrim

come home to receive your grace


It is November, you say, and we set aside

a day just for you to wrap up war

with the dissonance of fife and drum

and bagpipes blaring down main street


as if we can all finally dance

to the same tune


Sorry about that


My dancing days are long gone


I’d rather skate across the pond alone


I have more faith in ice.





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LWV Saturday meeting cancelled



Martha Dickinson
40 Washington Street
Ellsworth, ME 04605
667-5863


Facebook
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lwvme.org

Decolonizing Thanksgiving
With Maulian Dana

CANCELLED

What a shame. We were looking forward to it.
Maulian Dana has been unavoidably detained out of state.


No meeting tomorrow – Saturday.

 

 

Saturday, November 9, 12:00 noon 
Unitarian Universalist Church, 121 Bucksport Rd., Ellsworth
Decolonizing Thanksgiving
With Maulian Dana

We’ll look at the Thanksgiving holiday through Native American eyes. History has always been written by the winners — those who feel that they have won the right to portray that history in a light that waters down the consequences of their ‘winning’. However, by unpacking the truth we can all reach a place of better understanding and humanity. 

Maulian Dana serves as the appointed Tribal Ambassador of the Penobscot Nation where she grew up and now raises her two daughters. The Ambassador role functions as the government relations position of the nation and assists the Chief with matters in local, state, and federal government.  Her biggest accomplishment in her first term was her role in the new Maine laws banning Indian mascots in Maine Public Schools and Universities along with replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day in Maine. Maulian was an elected Tribal Council member before being appointed as Ambassador and is a 2006 graduate of the University of Maine Orono where she earned a BA in Political Science. In addition to her important day job, she also loves being a mother, writer, activist, dog-mom, and reads a lot of books.

Saturday, December 14, 2019
Holiday Party: Celebrating with the League of Women Voters – Dowenast

Details to be announced.

 
 
If you are not already a member of the League, we need your help now to carry out our mission and to strengthen our democracy.
Use the buttons below to share:
Share
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To view this email in your browser, click this link.

You received this email because you are a supporter of Democracy Maine, League of Women Voters of Maine, or Maine Citizens for Clean Elections. Thank you!

Our mailing address is:

Democracy Maine

PO Box 18187

Portland, ME  04112-8187


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You can unsubscribe from all groups immediately here.


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Fwd: LWV-Downeast Monthly Meetings


can you distribute?  Thanks, Starr

———- Forwarded message ———

Subject: FW:  LWV-Downeast Monthly Meetings

 

From: League of Women Voters – Downeast
Sent: Monday, October 28, 2019 1:05 PM
To: Starr gilmartin
Subject: LWV-Downeast Monthly Meetings

 

Saturday, November 9, 12:00 noon to 2:00 p.m.
Unitarian Universalist Church, 121 Bucksport Rd., Ellsworth

 

Decolonizing Thanksgiving

 

Lunch will be offered, $10 contribution suggested.

 

We meet on the 2nd Saturday of each month! Please join us and bring a friend.
See below for more information about upcoming programs.

 

 

Saturday, November 9, 12:00 noon 
Unitarian Universalist Church, 121 Bucksport Rd., Ellsworth
Decolonizing Thanksgiving
With Maulian Dana

We'll look at the Thanksgiving holiday through Native American eyes. History has always been written by the winners — those who feel that they have won the right to portray that history in a light that waters down the consequences of their 'winning'. However, by unpacking the truth we can all reach a place of better understanding and humanity. 

Maulian Dana serves as the appointed Tribal Ambassador of the Penobscot Nation where she grew up and now raises her two daughters. The Ambassador role functions as the government relations position of the nation and assists the Chief with matters in local, state, and federal government.  Her biggest accomplishment in her first term was her role in the new Maine laws banning Indian mascots in Maine Public Schools and Universities along with replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day in Maine. Maulian was an elected Tribal Council member before being appointed as Ambassador and is a 2006 graduate of the University of Maine Orono where she earned a BA in Political Science. In addition to her important day job, she also loves being a mother, writer, activist, dog-mom, and reads a lot of books.

 

 

Saturday, December 14, 2019
Holiday Party: Celebrating with the League of Women Voters – Dowenast

Details to be announced.

 

 

 

 

If you are not already a member of the League, we need your help now to carry out our mission and to strengthen our democracy.

 

 

Use the buttons below to share:

 

 

 

To view this email in your browser, click this link.

You received this email because you are a supporter of Democracy Maine, League of Women Voters of Maine, or Maine Citizens for Clean Elections. Thank you!

Our mailing address is:

Democracy Maine

PO Box 18187

Portland, ME 04112-8187


Add us to your address book

You can update your email address, change your subscription, or unsubscribe here.
You can unsubscribe from all groups immediately here.

 

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Grannies Respond: Online Auction for asylum seekers


Grannies Respond join forces with artists

to raise money for migrants and asylum seekers

“This is first-world work. Third-world work is walking 1,200 miles with a toddler on your hip, toward a better life.”

— Pixie Holbrook


    Four activist grandmothers in western Massachusetts have teamed up with more than two dozen artists in their area to raise money to assist migrants who are trapped in an inhumane limbo at the United States/Mexico border, as they wait to apply for asylum and gain entry into the U.S.

    Pixie Holbrook, Ruth Bowman and Michelle Sanger, all of Conway, Massachusetts, and Linda Sarage of Greenfield, Massachusetts, all retired educators and longtime social justice advocates, have collaborated with 27 artists to create “The Hilltown Online Arts Auction,” with 100-percent of the proceeds going to Grannies Respond/Abuelas Responden, a grassroots, non-profit organization that provides direct assistance to immigrants at the border and in communities across the country. 

    The Grannies Respond mission is to provide and elicit compassionate and respectful support for asylum seekers and immigrants who are seeking safety and security in the United States.

    Grannies Respond formed in spring 2018 in response to the immigration crisis at the nation’s southern border and, specifically, to reports that migrant children were being separated from their families and housed in detention “cages.” 

    The Grannies traveled to the border in July 2018 to see for themselves what the needs are, on the ground, and to shine a national light on the inhumanity of the Trump administration’s draconian immigration policies.

    Since then, Grannies Respond has formed chapters across the country that provide direct, daily aid to migrants and asylum seekers at the nation’s southern border. In addition, through its nationwide program, “The Overground Railroad,” Grannies Respond volunteers meet traveling migrants at bus stations in cities across the country to provide them with food and toiletry items, clothing, travel assistance, including translations services, along with warm smiles and encouragement, as the migrants make their way to the homes of family members and community hosts who will house them while they await immigration court dates.

    What’s more, with the recent administration policy change that prevents migrants seeking asylum from entering the U.S. as they wait to complete their applications, Grannies Respond volunteers now cross the southern border daily with food and other assistance.

A need to help

    Holbrook said when she and her fellow local activists heard about the work Grannies Respond is doing, they knew immediately they wanted to help. They formed Western Mass Grannies Respond to raise money for the national organization. 

    “The problems are enormous. But, we can each do one small piece, it can work. I’ve seen that happen,” Holbrook said. “It’s excruciating to do nothing, so you find avenues for making change. Creating this auction gives all of us the chance to donate fully, while acquiring art that will enrich our home and our day. It’s a win-win.”

    Among the items featured in the auction, which is sponsored in part by the Franklin County Continuing the Political Revolution (FCCPR), will be jewelry, fabric art, paintings, photography, pottery, wood, glass and stone.

    Among those who have stepped up is world-renowned glass artist Josh Simpson (www.salmonfallsgallery.com), who donated one of his famous glass planets. “Inhabited Planet” CONTEMPORARY GLASS (Red New Mexico) was created using a special technique the artist employs only once a year. By adding copper with manganese and silver to the glass, Simpson produces a planet of unusual colors that vary from deep terracotta to a brighter orangey red, with additions of black, blue, green and sometimes even yellow.

    “The artists have been so generous. They get called on a lot to donate to lots of causes, but everyone was so eager to help. I have great respect for them,” Holbrook said. “We hoped to get 20 pieces, but It was like a blink, and we had 48 pieces.”

A worthy cause

    “This is such a good cause,” said mosaic artist Cynthia Fisher of Buckland (bigbangmosaics.com). Fisher, who specializes in large-scale public art projects, says she didn’t hesitate to donate a work, “Earth, Our Planet,” a 12-inch-by-14-inch glass mosaic tile. 

    “As artists, we are deluged with invitations to donate to causes. With this one, there was no hesitation; I’m thrilled to do it,” Fisher said. “My heart goes out to those trying to come here for a better life. No one wants to leave their homes, the own countries. They only leave if there’s nothing for them.”

    Polly French (www.salmonfallsgallery.com), who creates nature-inspired mixed media, also says she didn’t hesitate to donate, and, indeed, made two original pieces for the auction.

    “This has helped me alleviate some of the helplessness and, indeed, shame I have been feeling,” French said. “There is no ‘us’ and ‘them.’ People do not deserve to be treated as U.S. Immigration has been treating the asylum seekers.” 

The particulars

    The auction went live Sunday, Oct. 27, at 6 a.m. 

To view the auction items and start bidding, visit http://fccpr.us/auctions/

Bidding will end Sunday, Nov. 10 at 5 p.m.

Payments will be made through the secure FCCPR Paypal account.

The Western Mass. Grannies Respond will deliver items to the top bidders within 50 miles of Greenfield, Massachusetts. Top bidders from farther away will be asked to pay shipping costs. 

To learn more about Grannies Respond/Abuelas Responden, and/or to donate directly, visit www.granniesrespond.org.


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Almost Sunrise at UUCE November 8


page1image13970816
Martha Dickinson
40 Washington Street
Ellsworth, ME 04605
667-5863



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Fwd: Taking Next Steps Toward Nuclear Abolition – Kathy Kelly



Subject: Taking Next Steps Toward Nuclear Abolition – Kathy Kelly


Kathy Kelly writes on this week’s trial, on grave charges, of nuclear weapons protesters the Kings Bay Plowshares 7.  



Taking Next Steps Toward Nuclear Abolition 

by Kathy Kelly
October 20, 2019

My friend Marianne Goldscheider, who is 87, suffered a broken hip in July, 2018 and then, in June 2019, it happened again. When she broke her hip the first time, she was running, with her son, on a football field. After the second break, when she fell in her kitchen, she recalls her only desire as she was placed on a stretcher. “I just wanted ‘the right pill,’” she says. She wished she could end her life. Marianne says her Catholic friends, who live nearby in the New York Catholic Worker community, persuaded her not to give up. They’ve long admired her tenacity, and over the years many have learned from her history as a survivor of the Nazi regime who was forced to flee Germany. Recalling her entry to the United States, Marianne jokes she may have been one of the only displaced persons who arrived in the United States carrying her skis. Yet she also carried deep anxieties, the “angst,” she says, of her generation. She still wonders about German people in the military and the aristocracy who knew Hitler was mad and, yet, didn’t try to stop him. “When and how,” she wonders, “do human beings get beyond all reasoning?”

Marianne is deeply disturbed by the madness of maintaining nuclear weapons arsenals and believes such weapons threaten planetary survival. She worries that, similar to the 1930s, citizens of countries possessing nuclear weapons sleepwalk toward utter disaster.

On April 4, 2018, several of Marianne’s close friends from the New York Catholic Worker community became part of the Kings Bay Plowshares 7 by entering the U.S. Navy Nuclear Submarine base in King’s Bay, GA and performing a traditional Plowshares action. Guided by lines from Scripture urging people to “beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks,” they prayed, reflected and then symbolically disarmed the Trident nuclear submarine site. The Kings Bay is home port to six nuclear armed Trident ballistic missile submarines with the combined explosive power of over 1825 Hiroshima bombs. One of the banners  they hung read “The Ultimate Logic of Trident is Omnicide.”

Referring to this sign, Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971, said the banner “is exactly right.” In an October 18 endorsement, he called their actions “necessary to avert a much greater evil.”

In late September, the Catholic Bishops of Canada, alarmed over the increasing danger nuclear weapons pose, urged the Government of Canada to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted at the UN in 2017. The Canadian bishops issued their statement on September 26, the United Nations International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons. In it, they note the  Vatican has already signed and ratified the Treaty. “The ashes of World War I and the centenary of its armistice,” wrote Pope Francis, “should teach us that future acts of aggression are not deterred by the law of fear, but rather by the power of calm reason that encourages dialogue and mutual understanding as a means of resolving differences.”

The seven defendants, in everyday life, practice nonviolence while serving people who are often the least cared for in our society. Like Marianne, I have known each defendant for close to four decades. They have risked their lives, safety and health in numerous actions of civil disobedience. When imprisoned, they write and speak of the cruel abuse of human beings and the racist, primitive nature of the United States prison-industrial complex. They’ve also chosen to visit or live in war zones, providing witness on behalf of people trapped under bombardment. They live simply, share resources and strive to help build a better world.

Nevertheless, beginning Monday, they will face serious criminal charges and potentially harsh sentences for their action at Kings Bay.  

Marianne anxiously awaits their trial. “Why,” she asks, “isn’t there more coverage?”

One of the defendants, Rev. Steve Kelly, SJ, a Jesuit priest, referred to himself in a recent letter as “a tenuous voice in the wilderness.” He further explained that he is among the wilderness of the incarcerated, “two and a quarter million folks comprising the human warehouses in the empire.” Steve has been imprisoned in the Glynn County jail since April 4, 2018.

His letter continues: 

And your presence today clearly demonstrates that while you can jail the resisters you cannot destroy the resistance. In this advent of our trial, we have a blue-ribbon legal team to whom I’m sure you’ll show your own gratitude.

This trial and the preliminary process represents the second phase of our witness. It is the Kings Bay Plowshares’ attempt to continue with what began in nonviolence – and hopefully without arrogance – to convert the judiciary according to Prophet Isaiah 2:4. As these judges historically legitimize the nuclear idols, we anticipate the government’s presentation of and the judge’s likely approval of motions preventing the jury from hearing our defense. The mechanism is an in limine – you’ll hear more about that if you don’t know already, but essentially it is, in the words of the late Phil Berrigan, a gag order.

Late in the afternoon of October 18, Judge Woods issued her long-awaited orders regarding testimony allowed in court. She will not allow testimony about the illegality of nuclear weapons, the necessity of civil disobedience, or individual motivations and  personal faith. Fortunately, the many dozens of people filling the Brunswick, GA courtroom on October 21 will help communicate the essential evidence that won’t be shared within the court. In alternative settings, such as over meals, during a Festival of Hope, and as part of a Citizens Tribunal, they’ll discuss and eventually share reasons that motivated our friends to perform the Kings Bay Plowshares 7 action.

A recent op-ed in the New York Times suggests the Kings Bay Plowshares 7 message is entering public discourse. The defendants have clarified that the U.S. nuclear weapon arsenal robs resources desperately needed for food, shelter, health care and education. The New York Times notes if we could reach a total nuclear weapons ban, we could save roughly $43 billion each year on weapons, delivery systems and upgrades. “That’s roughly the same amount we’ve allocated in federal hurricane aid for Puerto Rico.”

Marianne laments the madness which considers nuclear weapons a modern idol deserving of great sacrifice. She is rightfully wary of social and cultural developments that consider such madness normal.

She and I commiserate about recovering from hip fractures, (I’ve been on the mend for the past month), but we both know that Steve Kelly’s invitation deserves our greatest attention.

Tiny postcards are the only means of correspondence allowed to or from the Glynn County jail. On one of these,  Steve wrote a message to a large gathering in New York celebrating the Kings Bay Plowshares 7 action. “I am encouraged by your presence,” he wrote, “to ask that this small effort of ours not be the last word in nuclear abolition.”

Kathy Kelly (kathy@vcnv.org) co-coordinates Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org)

Photo caption:  The Kings Bay Plowshares 7 activists at oceanfront in Georgia
Photo credit: Kings Bay Plowshares

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